What will Humanity look like in 20 years?

Question from the Internet:

“How do you see the world in 20 years with regard to technology, business, relationships, and culture?”

Technology, business, relationships and culture are all the results and consequences of human nature. We have a tendency of looking at these consequences and ignoring the root cause. This is why all our “solutions”, and “inventions” fail after a while since they are all symptomatic treatments aimed at the consequences without treating the root cause.

Everything we have ever built and we still build is the product of our inherently self-serving, self-justifying, egocentric and individualistic nature. While we blindly follow this inherent nature we experience our existence through ruthless competition, by succeeding at each other’s expense, defining and justifying ourselves by rising above others or defeating and destroying others.

This is clearly reflected in our culture and in our relationships — today even the classical family model is “dead” — and our technological progress is primarily aimed at controlling, manipulating and destroying each other.

So how humanity will look in 20 years solely depend on recognizing and accepting our inherent nature behind all the problems we are suffering from now and suffered from throughout history.

Moreover, we will need the willingness and ability to change ourselves, as without changing how we relate to each other and Nature, developing a new type of human existence above and against our instinctive nature, we might not even survive the next 20 years!

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I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.

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Zsolt Hermann

I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.