The value of other humans

Zsolt Hermann
2 min readJan 24, 2023

Question from the Internet:

“What value do people place on the continuing existence of other humans?”

Our inherent nature and worldview are 100% self-serving, self-justifying, subjective, and individualistic.

According to this worldview and inherent nature, we would love to exist on our own, having the whole world only for ourselves.

But this is not possible. We need the connection, cooperation, and assistance of other people for basic survival and to fulfill the different pleasures we consider our life’s purpose.

Some hope that we can replace most of those activities that presently require human beings with robots, but that is still a long shot.

So the value we place on the continuing survival of other humans depends on how important they are in helping us fulfill our needs and obtain all the pleasures we want.

This is how our inherent nature drives us and directs us.

There is a completely different viewpoint and type of existence that could place very different value on the continuing survival of others humans.

We can learn, taste, and experience a completely different form of life, where instead of our usual, selfish, and individualistic “single-cell” existence, we shift to a totally selfless and altruistic “multi-cellular” collective human existence.

The acquired collective life-experience with its collective consciousness and “composite” and multi-angled perception of reality would provide us with a vastly different experience of life.

By that, we can sense and enjoy life without any personal or individual problems, sensing existence beyond the usual, egocentric, and subjective limitations of time, space, physical life, or death.

This kind of relationship and connection to others is something we can all obtain here and now, with the help of a special, empirical scientific method.

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Zsolt Hermann

I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.