How can we fight for peace?!

Question from the Internet:

“Is fighting for peace counterintuitive?”

You are right, we have to fight for peace, the question is, who should we fight?

Fighting, convincing, destroying others for peace is an oxymoron. We can see the effect of this philosophy in history and in our days.

As long as we fight each other for peace human existence is constant war, with temporary ceasefires, meaningless peace treaties scattered in between.

We are in constant war because we are all born with an inherently “warmongering”, 100% self-serving, self-justifying, individualistic nature. knowingly, unknowingly we all thrive on ruthless competition, succeeding, surviving justifying ourselves at the expense of others.

If we truly want to fight for peace, we need to start to fight against our own nature, learning how to build positive, sustainable, mutually responsible, and mutually complementing interconnections, cooperation with each other — above and against ourselves.

This is not peace from Hollywood movies, as our inherent nature cannot be suppressed, erased. The instinctive mutual distrust, mutual animosity remains, even grows.

But we can learn how to interconnect like the diverse, seemingly incompatible cells, organs of our own biological body in order to create and sustain a qualitatively much higher, “collective, mutual, truly Human” life between us — in similarity with Nature, with the support of Nature’s forces and laws.

We have the appropriate, purposeful, and practical method to achieve this, and we have the increasingly pressing, threatening world situation to provide the negative incentive.

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I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.

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Zsolt Hermann

I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.