Do we need to worry about the fact the human population has reached 8 billion?

Question from the Internet:

“The world has reached 8 billion people, and now I’m paranoid: How will we survive in a world with so many people, poverty, and hunger will increase? My dream is to have children; what should I do? Give up my dream?”

I want to lessen, even calm, your paranoia. The number of people living in the world does not determine or cause a life full of suffering, poverty and hunger for us.

The planet has enough resources for even double that amount of people.

Our problem is the “footprint” most people possess, the reckless and endless excessive overconsumption our “modern” Western society is based on. Moreover, whatever we have, we do not distribute equally; our distribution is not even close to some form of relative and just equality.

If we learned — from Nature’s finely balanced and mutually integrated system — how to build human societies properly and refined our existence to stay within the optimal parameters of true, modern and comfortable natural necessities and available resources, nobody would need to worry about the future of their children.

This requires a unique, purposeful and practical educational method.

We need to come to understand and actually and tangibly feel how much we are mutually integrated and interdependent, while Nature’s strict laws that govern the general balance and homeostasis that life depends on are also obligatory for us.

Then, with the help of this education, we could adjust and adapt ourselves to a human society that is also “accepted” by Nature’s finely balanced and integrated system.

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I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.

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Zsolt Hermann

I am a Hungarian-born Orthopedic surgeon presently living in New Zealand, with a profound interest in how mutually integrated living systems work.